The Abel Competition The Norwegian Mathematical Olympiad Niels Henrik Abels matematikkonkurranse

Calendar and selected news

Calendar overview

See the calendar page for further details and past events. There is also an overview of the dates for the Norwegian science olympiads (now updated for the school year 2018/2019).

  • Baltic Way 2018St. Petersburg
  • The first round of the Abel competition – Held at the schools
  • The second round of the Abel competition – Held at the schools
  • The Abel competition finals – NTNU, Trondheim
  • EGMO 2019Kyiv, Ukraine
  • IMO 2019 – Bath, United Kingdom

Upcoming changes to the Abel competition

From the fall of 2018, the Norwegian Centre for Mathematics Education will take over much of the practical work associated with the competition. The biggest change is that the competition goes digital. The practical details are still being worked out. More details will appear later. See also the Norwegian version of this announcement, which is a bit more detailed.

By Harald Hanche-Olsen,

Results from IMO 2017

In the 59th International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, Norway made 56th place among 107 competing countries. This year's winning country was USA, followed by Russia, China, Ukraina, and Thailand.

Andreas Alberg came in 147th, and Bjørnar Gullikstad Hem in 157th place, among 594 competitors, and won Bronze medals thereby. Additionally, Erik Mingjun Ma received honourable mention for his solution of Problem 1.

In the next four years, IMO will be arranged in the UK (2019), Russia (2020), USA (2021), and then in Norway (2022).

By Harald Hanche-Olsen,

The 2018 finals

The finals were held on 7 March at NTNU in Trondheim. Andreas Alberg (Fagerborg skole) gained first place with 38 points. Bjørnar Gullikstad Hem (Nadderud vgs) and Erik Ma (Trondheim katedralskole) got second and third places, with 34 and 31 points. The prize ceremony was held at Frimurerlogen, where the minister of education and integration, Jan Tore Sanner, presented the prizes. We have a more detailed score board.

By Harald Hanche-Olsen,

Results from round 2

Etter to runder i Abelkonkurransen har Andreas Alberg (Fagerborg skole, 185 poeng) førsteplassen, fulgt av Sigvart Brendberg (Kristen vgs Trøndelag, 175 poeng), Donny Chan (Møglestu vgs, 160 poeng) og Bjørnar Gullikstad Hem (Nadderud vgs, også 160 poeng).

Andreas Alberg (Fagerborg skole, 185 points) has taken first place after two rounds of the Abelcompetition, followed by Sigvart Brendberg (Kristen vgs Trøndelag, 175 points), Donny Chan (Møglestu vgs, 160 points), and Bjørnar Gullikstad Hem (Nadderud vgs, also 160 points).

In the second round there were 413 competitors from 135 schools. The results from the best third – 136 participants – can be found here (in Norwegian; updated 16 February). (Those who have not given permission by checking the appropriate box on the answer sheet, are listed as N.N. If you do want your name on the list after all, or if you prefer to be listed as N.N., get in touch, and we will update the list.)

At least the 20 first on the list will be invited to the finals in Trondheim. We usually invite a few more, in order to recruit for international competitions. (Exchange students without Norwegian citizenship or permanent residence in Norway do not qualify for the international competitions.) The exact number will to be invited will be decided upon very soon, after which an invitation email is sent to the finalists.

A few words regarding the problems: Clearly, we have made this problem set too difficult. That's especially unfortunate after we made such good progress with achieving a reasonable level of difficulty in the first round! We will learn from this, and do better next year. (But there should always be some difficult problems!)

We have also received a number of reactions to problem 2. That's a trick question, they say, and that is not entirely wrong. A very large number of competitors were tricked by it. Again, we should learn from this and not do it again.

Below is a list of points and cumulative percentages. For example, those who earned 120 points are among the 8.5 percent best.

185: 0.2% · 175: 0.5% · 160: 1.0% · 147: 1.2% · 146: 2.2% · 145: 2.4% · 141: 2.7% · 140: 3.1% · 135: 4.1% · 133: 4.4% · 132: 4.6% · 131: 5.1% · 130: 5.3% · 128: 5.6% · 127: 6.1% · 126: 6.5% · 125: 7.0% · 122: 7.5% · 121: 8.0% · 120: 8.5% · 117: 9.0% · 116: 9.7% · 115: 10.2% · 112: 10.7% · 111: 10.9% · 110: 12.1% · 109: 12.6% · 108: 13.1% · 107: 13.8% · 105: 14.8% · 104: 15.5% · 103: 16.5% · 102: 17.4% · 101: 17.9% · 100: 18.9% · 99: 19.1% · 98: 19.4% · 97: 20.6% · 96: 21.1% · 95: 22.8% · 94: 24.5% · 93: 25.2% · 92: 25.9% · 91: 26.4% · 90: 28.1% · 89: 29.3% · 88: 31.2% · 87: 32.2% · 86: 32.9% · 85: 34.1% · 84: 35.1% · 83: 35.4% · 82: 37.0% · 81: 38.5% · 80: 40.9% · 79: 42.1% · 78: 44.1% · 77: 46.2% · 76: 47.5% · 75: 50.8% · 74: 54.2% · 73: 56.7% · 72: 58.6% · 71: 62.0% · 70: 64.9% · 69: 65.9% · 68: 66.3% · 67: 66.6% · 66: 68.5% · 65: 71.9% · 64: 74.3% · 63: 76.5% · 62: 80.4% · 61: 84.0% · 60: 86.0% · 59: 86.7% · 58: 87.2% · 57: 88.4% · 56: 89.6% · 55: 92.5% · 54: 94.2% · 53: 95.9% · 52: 97.1% · 51: 100.0%.

By Harald Hanche-Olsen,  · updated , , and

Results from Round 1

The results from Round 1 have been recorded and quality checked. The list of results is now available. (The list is updated after round 2: Names and classes corrected.)

In total there were 4213 contestants from 247 schools. (That is an increase of nearly 7 % since last year, and the highest number we have had in years.) At least 51 points will be required to go on to round 2, and 38 points to receive a diploma. So it appears that we have succeeded reasonably well in reducing the level of difficulty compared to last year.

For you who wish to compare your own result with others': Here is a list of points and cumulative percentages. For example, those who got 33 points are among the top 50.06% of the participants.

100: 0.05% · 96: 0.07% · 95: 0.21% · 92: 0.24% · 91: 0.28% · 90: 0.36% · 87: 0.40% · 86: 0.50% · 85: 0.57% · 83: 0.59% · 82: 0.66% · 81: 0.76% · 80: 0.83% · 79: 0.88% · 78: 0.90% · 77: 1.04% · 76: 1.16% · 75: 1.28% · 74: 1.40% · 73: 1.50% · 72: 1.64% · 71: 1.71% · 70: 1.92% · 69: 1.99% · 68: 2.21% · 67: 2.40% · 66: 2.47% · 65: 2.97% · 64: 3.23% · 63: 3.32% · 62: 3.47% · 61: 3.92% · 60: 4.87% · 59: 5.27% · 58: 5.70% · 57: 6.08% · 56: 6.60% · 55: 7.55% · 54: 8.36% · 53: 8.97% · 52: 9.76% · 51: 10.63% · 50: 12.34% · 49: 13.10% · 48: 14.48% · 47: 15.62% · 46: 17.16% · 45: 19.75% · 44: 20.98% · 43: 22.67% · 42: 24.64% · 41: 26.51% · 40: 30.29% · 39: 32.40% · 38: 34.68% · 37: 36.84% · 36: 39.47% · 35: 44.79% · 34: 47.57% · 33: 50.06% · 32: 52.77% · 31: 55.49% · 30: 60.74% · 29: 63.21% · 28: 66.41% · 27: 68.88% · 26: 71.66% · 25: 77.09% · 24: 79.33% · 23: 81.63% · 22: 83.57% · 21: 85.54% · 20: 90.10%.

By Harald Hanche-Olsen,  · updated

Baltic Way 2017

Baltic Way 2017 is over. The team from St. Petersburg won the competition, while the Norwegian team came in eighth place among the eleven participating nations.

By Harald Hanche-Olsen,
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